What I Learned From A Weight Problem

Today's topic comes courtesy Robert Hruzek of Middle Zone Musings. This is all about learning from an unusual source. You might not think you could learn a wide variety of life lessons from a weight problem, but you surely can.

And, dear readers, this will relate to insurance too.

The first thing that I learned from having a weight problem is that persistence pays. If you just read the statistics on how many people lose weight and keep it off, you'd simply give up. Some doctors estimate that as few as 1 in 10 people actually lose weight and maintain it. As someone who has lost weight, dieting and otherwise, more than once, I'd have to agree. However, as my mother always told me: if at first you don't succeed, try, try again. At age 46, I've finally found a health plan that works for me, and which is letting any unneeded pounds go. It's not deprivation; it's eating to be healthy. It's something I'll be able to keep up with indefinitely. I think that's the trick.

Don't think this lesson isn't a good one to learn if you are dealing with an insurance claim that isn't being paid. I've blogged recently on Katrina claims in front of the courts right now; these are all about people who didn't give up when their claim was denied. Persistence pays. 

I've also learned that overweight is a complex and multi-faceted challenge, that often has sneaky components waiting to trip up even the most persistent. At the moment, I'm under a naturopath's care. He discovered through some testing that I have an overgrowth of yeast in my body. While yeast is normal to the human body, in excess it can cause all kinds of nasty problems, including fatigue and crazy cravings. As you can imagine, the twin evils of fatigue and cravings will sabotage even the healthiest eating plan.

Now, if I thought that weight loss was all about willpower, I'd be beating up on myself and giving up yet again. Instead, when I realized what was happening, I went to get help from my naturopath. Now, the cravings are disappearing, the fatigue is much reduced and I'm getting right back on the horse, as they say.

A doctor might not have found the yeast problem. A few cravings won't send your doctor checking for yeast, unless you show other signs of serious infection. This is a great reason to have health insurance that covers not just your basic doctor's visit but also other health professionals that have skills and training that your doctor doesn't. My extended health care will cover me for naturopath's visits, up to 80% of the cost of the visit, with a cap on the benefits at $500. I normally make use of the full $500 each year.   

As a result of these kinds of experiences as well as years of coping with being treated badly because of my weight, I've learned not to judge those who are overweight. In most cases a severely overweight person is someone who has both emotional issues and underlying health challenges that make weight loss a significant hurdle; in all other ways, these people are just like me. Who am I to say that they could lose weight "if they just put their mind to it"? I know what my journey has been like -- it's required a lot of learning and a lot of investment on my part to solve the riddle of my own weight problem. Discipline alone would never have been enough.

When at my highest weight (225 pounds on a 5 foot 4 inch frame), I even wondered about bariatric surgery. It seemed like the fast way out. However, I've since learned that those who get the surgery actually end up with a lifetime challenge to nourish themselves well. If they don't deal with the emotional issues that led to eating as a solution in the first place (usually, the taproot of the weight riddle), other problems quickly surface. Personally, I'm still in the position where I can tackle the issue of nourishment and health, without the surgery. And while I am now what many would consider "normal" weight, I'm fortunate that I don't have any serious health issues that might have slowed me down. For that, I consider myself lucky.

Luck is part of the insurance equation too. How lucky do you feel? Insurance is about preparing for when your luck runs out, and doing so while you have the resources to do it, before trouble surfaces.

Insurance doesn't solve everything though, just like solving my weight problem won't fix everything. You can't eliminate all risk, no matter how hard you try. So, I take care of my health, as best I can. And I pay my insurance, just in case.  

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This is the complete list of blogs that participated in Robert's writing project. There's some interesting reading here! Keep in mind that each one finishes the phrase "What I Learned From…"

"… Teen Girl Squad", by Markk at My Opinions Are Important

"… the Mt. Pinatubo Eruption", by Ronald Huerca at Ronalfy.com

"… Drugs", by Sam Brougher at Forest Azuaran

"… a Mesquite Tree", by Mike DeWitt at Spooky Action

"… Drinking Starbucks Coffee", by George Manty at Can I Make Big Money Online

"… My Wife!", by Rajaram Sethuraman at Thoughts of a Rambler

"… Having a Daughter", by Marco Richter at FitForFreedom

"… Norm", by Joe Raasch at The Happy Burro

"… my mentors", by Karin H. at The Kiss Business Too

"… Procrastinating", by Yvonne Russell at Grow Your Writing Business

"… a Squirrel", by G.L. Hoffman at What Would Dad Say

"… Blogging", by Gayla McCord at Mom Gadget

"… a Weight Problem", by Monique Attinger at Insurance Guide 101

"… Taking Out the Garbage", by Michael Chantrel at Mortgage Guide 101 Blog

"… RUMMAGING!" by William Tully at LOGICal eMOTIONs

"… A Light Switch", by Robert Hruzek at Middle Zone Musings

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Monique L. Attinger 

3 comments
Posted by gl hoffman on May 7,2007 at 1:05 PM

Great post!

~Best, GL  http://blogs.jobdig.com/wwds

what would dad say

Posted by editor@insuranceguide101.com on May 7,2007 at 8:05 AM

Thanks for dropping by, Robert. Glad to have been part of this writing project... and to get a chance to share on something important to me, and relevant to insurance at the same time.

Posted by Robert Hruzek on May 6,2007 at 7:43 PM

Monique, your thoughts will be invaluable for others in the same situation. Thanks so much for participating in the writing project!

Cheers!

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